Skip to main content

About your Search

20121205
20121213
STATION
CNBC 7
CSPAN2 5
LINKTV 3
CNNW 2
FBC 2
CNN 1
CSPAN 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
. who have good home environments, right? who don't run a crazy ship at home. the kids with a crazy environment, homework hurts then. we have to make it equitable and fair for them to have the same environment to work on the crazy, familiarial problem. >> greg: what is french homework? riding a bicycle with a basket and bah quet? >> andrea: drinking red wine and smoking cigarettes. you got a-plus. >> bob: they go home and get loaded with wine. >> greg: i'm half french. bost you are? >> greg: yes. >> andrea: oh hl la. >> dana: que paso. >> greg: what does that mean? >> dana: what's up in spanish. >> greg: what does vit to do with this? you know who words from a language. >> dana: no. i know more than that. i do. i swear. feliz navidad. that is coming up, how much do they know about fe will beiz navdad? andrea hit the streets to find out. >> can you name tall santa reindeer? >> prancer. >> ♪ on this 12th day of christmas my true love gave to me 12 --" >> geese allaying. >> dana: christmas trivia directly ahead. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned somet
environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial section) (testimonial section) did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to a friend or loved one. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and brochure. why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do for you. lyric from phonak. life is on. >> i'm on a gain for the dow when we start our wednesday morning, just shy of 13,300. now this. warren buffett and george soros want congress to raise the estate tax. what is it with the superrich guys? they push for higher taxes that they don't pay. perhaps they feel guilty about their wealth? joining us now is dr. keith ablow, fox news medical a-team. we always liked dr. ablow on the show because he's an original thinker and delivers originality, we like that and appreciate that. i'm not being-- >> don't study much. >> so it has to be original. stuart: just off the top of
appealed to him, and they didn't now. finding neither subjects nor an artistic environment that suited him, he left london and traveled 275 miles to the north. he settled in the small fishing village of cullercoats on the north sea and rented a studio two houses from the rescue station, overlooking the beach. here was his first encounter with the wild and elemental forces of nature. the rhythm of life in cullercoats was termined by the fishing boats, which set out at dusk and returned in the morning. gradually, homer began to replace descriptive detail with the concentrated drama of individuals bent on the task of survival in a rugged environment. although he had intended to stay in cullercoats only for the summer, he remained almost two years. in october, he watched the life brigade rescue the crew of a wrecked ship-- the iron crown. he sketched the scene from the beach and later painted one of his largest and most ambitious watercolors. at cullercoats, homer's works took on a new monumentality. in the lives of the fisherwomen, he perceived both the gravity of the human condition and the
started disappearing and dying off because they were not changing with the environment, but other animals came in in its place and started taking over. that's why we have these fossils. >> so, these fossils were stuck in all of these layers-- >> yes. >> --that we're seein' today when we hiked around red rock canyon. >> exactly. exactly. >> wow. it's an amazing story that is told right here. you're summing up something that happened-- how many years ago these animals were here? >> we are looking at these animals found here were from about 10,000 years but we can go almost back to the periods where the pleistocene almost about a millions years ago. >> really? >> yes. >> so the fossil history, the animal history of this part of california goes way back. >> way back. >> and thank goodness, it's been preserved. >> yes, definitely. >> and thank goodness, caltrans is still finding this stuff when it's widening highways. >> exactly. that's where most of the finds come from, accidentally. >> okay. we have left the visitor's center. and what makes this whole adventure so interesting is that everyw
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
effective agricultural environment around fez within, say, 15 or 20 miles radius. but you also had very effective forms of nonhuman transport -- donkeys, camels, horses, mules -- that could bring in all of the kinds of supplies that the city needed. now, that's one reason why you had such high population densities. one of the effects of really high population densities, of course, is to create very dense urban markets, lots of consumers concentrated in small spaces. and this is one of the reasons why fez has such a high degree of urban specialization. keach: as in ancient ostia, almost everyone in fez is a full-time specialist. in the tanning industry alone, there are some 20 specialized activities required to process skins into leather. there are washers and hair removers, buyers and sellers, and transport specialists. there are even specialties within a specialty. there are people who handle the donkeys that bring skins into the market, while others handle the donkeys taking skins out. this is a hair removing factory. it is run by mr. abdelrrahman ovadghiri. interpreter: we get up ear
as their environment, or industrial transportation, heating ventilation. so you've got a security company and what we consider to be the core of this, in many ways. significant buyback of shares, and pay dividends. but they're not moving it up, they're paying it in march. >> a new ceo comes in, listed the pelts. why should you buy anything with the pelts involved. this is work for "mad money," after pelts provided it. after. you're up 11%. in other words, you don't know before it. versus the s&p being up 4%. this goes back to 2005. he's been just a terrific guy to invest with, as, by the way, everybody tells me he's a terrific guy. >> he is a nice guy. his activism, he sort of moved it to the performance side of things, and the operational side. it was started many ways by hines, which was a nasty fight, now he's on the board. he and johnson are buddy buddy. >> johnson told me he felt pelts' idea after initial resistance, that pelts said his ideas were great. >> best buy, one of the big losers this morning. you point out merrill has a note telling a lot of people what they probably already know, fina
head first to environment filled with uncertainty. >> they are empty monument to bad economy. the developers have been left incomplete until they secure financing. they say the institutional construction lending has not bounced back from the 2008 economic crisis. >> they run out of money or combination of running low on money and not having enough sales where the condominium or co-op sales or the market for rentals doesn't appear to be strong enough to justify completion of the project. >> right now, the city says there are 691 star projects. number by 17%. half are 45% stalled since 2009. try and kick start construction, american institute of architect has a web site where they pitch the project to potential investors and by pass the banks. other cities have seen the housing construction rebounds by as much as 18%. all signs of a growing national turn-around. some say construction spending is cyclical. in 1976, the manhattan posh upper east side dotted with the unfinished building and vacant lot. because of a recession that sent off institutional spen spending. >> money did
and troubled environments. environments. there is so much to talk about. in an area we have been talking about on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, an
all loss and enhanced that. on some level create the environment in which people can explore literature especially. there aren't enough programs like this around the country. i wish there were more. the literary community in albany is quite ridge. we are any feedback loop with it. i don't think such an operation as the writers institute could have been created in the first place without there being not only a strong group of writers, in columbia county where a lot of new york city writers have weekend homes all the way up to saratoga and beyond, the writers colony -- the writers' groups in hudson, n.y. east and west into western massachusetts, west to syracuse. that is the audience, sort of circumference we work with so when you go back and you find a general population quite proud of albany's connection to henry james and herman melville or bret harte or a little bit further east, emily dickinson or further south, say hi to our old friend walt whitman or edith wharton, when we have this sense of cultural heritage, it helps to amplify the writer's own sense of being part of a
left, let's talk about the current environment. what are you hearing from a lot of the senior executives that are asking for your advice or if you're in a board room or chatting with them especially in terms of the fiscal cliff and concern about making big decisions or lack thereof and not putting money at it. >> the interesting part is talk about the fiscal cliff is the talk about the talk about the fiscal cliff. i don't think people are as concerned as the level of chatter that goes around. i think the chatter is more than the concern. the fiscal cliff just happens to be a preset deal on a scale of one to ten. it's a deal that is possible as outcome. i think what the country should hope for is that we come up with a better deal. business wants the rules. i understand why business is very much do a deal. do a something. because a business then can make their plans around that. if a marginal tax rate goes up too high here, they'll put a plant somewhere else. you can make those decisions. they want to know the rules. >> know the rules of the road. >> there's an america out ther
are smith travel, if you look at those numbers, it's a very positive environment. the fiscal cliff will affect people when employment gets affected. this is a real issue. if you see something occurring with employment, we're sensitive, we're monitoring, we represent the folks that are going to be most affected if they don't do their job in washington. we're obviously concerned about it. if they deal with it, which we think they will. we think that next year should be pretty positive. >> meanwhile big party tonight? >> big party tonight, big party last night. >> that's what the city's all about. >> we'll be opening white plains in may, it will be a little warmer than it was up there last night. it's very exciting to see those hotels get done. 1,000 jobs for the city. >> you see at the bottom of your screen, nat gas inventory. >> listen natural gas prices are extending their gains from yet, after that 4% rally that we saw. we're looking at resistance perhaps around the 4.75 level. we saw a natural gas level that was certainly not what analysts were expectings. 65 billion cubic feet w
. someone get me a latte will ya, please? it's hard to see opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? make a wish! i wish we could lie here forever. i wish this test drive was over, so we could head back to the dealership. [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. test drive! but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a jetta. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >> brian: edkoch expected to be released from the medical center. he ha
, environment, congestion, still remain dedicated to moving positive inner-city passenger rail and particularly high-speed service if the united states is falling further behind and instead of being behind, those brief comments, patient ranking member who was so nice to me yesterday. >> thank you, mr. chairman, the minority -- [talking over each other] >> i can tell you i'm going to hang. >> nothing can move don young from the center. >> that is the size of that. it takes five people to move it. >> that is right. >> thank you, mr. chairman. chairman, i have been involved in the issue of high-speed rail since early on in my career in congress in nearly 90s, on the appropriations committee, designated the first proposed high-speed rail routes in america and one of them was from eugene, ore. british columbia, and we will hear a little later from paula hammond who is secretary of transportation from washington who will describe our progress or lack mara of, small amount of progress in achieving those goals but we are plugging away at it. this is not an easy thing. right of way issues are come w hy
opportunity in today's challenging environment. unless you have the right perspective. bny mellon wealth management has the vision and experience to look beyond the obvious. we'll uncover opportunities, find hidden risk, and make success a reality. bny mellon wealth management your soups are so awesomely delicious my husband and i can't stop eating 'em! what's...that... on your head? can curlers! tomato basil, potato with bacon... we've got a lot of empty cans. [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. sven's home security gets the most rewards of any small business credit card! how does this thing work? oh, i like it! [ garth ] sven's small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase, every day! woo-hoo!!! so that's ten security gators, right? put them on my spark card! why settle for less? testing hot tar... great businesses deserve the most rewards! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? here's your invoice. >>> its dallas cowboys rally
'll get. >> you know what, i think the environment, as you look out to next year, is really difficult, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i th
and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. (testimonial section) (testimonial secti) (testinial s section did you know, 94% of people who use lyric would recommend lyric to afrien. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. toearn more about lyric's advanced technology, call or visit trylyric.com for a risk--free 30--day trial offer. you'll also get a free informational dvd and ochure why wait? hear today what a little lyric cacan do f you. lyric from phonak. life is on. stuart: the bad economy, taxes regulations they will take a bite out of bonuses for wall street workers this year. don't feel too bad, though. the aaerage bonus for wall street worker will be about $101,000. which is 16 1/2% less than last year and a 50% decline from the good old days back in 2006. >>> we love to show you cool expensive items on this program. we had diamonds last week. remember? well, today, is the second day of hanukkah. we have some very expensive menorahs. joining us now is the founder of j greenstein and company. it's an auction house that deals with jewish
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
than we've seen. i think the key question is going to be is that sustainable in an environment that's very promotional and with a competitor, sam's, that is starting to pivot toward more price reinvestment. >> your skepticism echos what the journal had this morning. great business, smart model, great balance sheet management, but at $98 here, it's hard to move the stock s that your thesis? >> it is. the stock is certainly richly valued. we also think that costco is largely a membership fee model. the company increased the membership fee about a year ago. you're now seeing decelerated growth for membership fees. it was a nice part of the thesis. that's kind of in the rear view mirror. the stock looks expensive. not a lot of margin opportunity in the model. it's a good growth opportunity. a phenomenal business. really fully valued here. >> finally, colin, the special dividend took a lot of people by surprise. do you think that marks a shift in the behavior of balance sheet management at the company? >> the company is extremely underleveraged, i.e. overcapitalized. they have excess cas
influence on foreign fighters and jihadists and syria. the space to positively influenced the environment is narrowing and may be closing. the establishment of the new opposition group combined with better understanding of the armed population provides a renewed opportunity for a more assertive u.s. policy. let me propose a couple of ideas. number one, first, the u.s. must lead an effort to better coordinate international support for the moderate syrian opposition. several countries over the past 20 months have provided different degrees of military political and humanitarian assistance to syrian opposition groups inside of the country. which has led to a common complaint from those in the opposition. they say that the u.s. and the international community have applied considerable pressure on the syrian opposition to called less and coordinate. yet these countries providing assistance to the opposition are sometimes not coordinated among themselves. and sometimes work at cross purposes. they want us to keep our own advice, which i think is a fair statement. a lack of international coordin
. there was a tremendous virtuousity but an amazing image. both were among the most profound in any musical environment. >> anthony, how do you think eebl remembered? >> i think he'll be remembered for the shear quality of what he did. also for being a great ambassador for this music. when we think about things like world music or the west fascination with eastern culture, a lot of that started with ravi shankar. >> all right. thank you. we appreciate it. >> thanks, suzanne. >>> the pope already has more than 700,000 twitter followers. i'm not kidding. he sent his first tweet today. we'll tell you exactly what he wrote. i'm the messenger, by the way. what's your name? joanne. with the hundreds that i save with progressive on my car insurance, this tree is on me. no way. way. this tree is on me. really?! yes. aah! let me just trim it up a little bit for you. [ buzzing ] thank you. saving's greetings. you guys are gonna get this tree right here? are you sure that's the one? i'll tie it to the roof for you. make savings a new holiday tradition. ♪ make savings a new holiday tradition. capella university
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)